Phone:508-495-0248
Phone:508-495-0248

Archives

Tinkerbell and the Legend of the Neverbeast at Peg Noonan Park

July 8, 2015 by Beth Colt

Come watch family friendly movies projected over Peg Noonan Park each Wednesday, in the historic downtown Falmouth area.  Grab dinner and some ice cream, and sit back to relax in the festive main street atmosphere.  Chairs or blankets recommended. Begins at dusk.

Jamaican Grill Night at Coonamessett Farm

July 1, 2015 by Beth Colt

Feast on a fine Jamaican buffet of locally produced food, in the Cape Cod night air, while listening to the upbeat sounds of steel drum music by Vernon.  Explore the beautiful grounds of Coonamessett Farm complete with Alpacas and countless rows of delicious veggies.

Wednesday Evenings through September 16th

5 – 8 pm

 

 MENU
 Salads

CF Caesar
Jamaican Tossed
Spanish Town Style Potato
Millie’s Cucumber
Tropical Fruit
Watermelon
Rasta  Pasta
Jalapeno Cornbread
One Down Soup 
 

Entree’s
Curried Goat
Seasoned Rice and Peas
Callaloo 
Fried Plantains
Festival Dumplings
Corn on the Cob

Batata  Pudding

From-the-grill:  Jerk Chicken and Pork with fresh fruit salsa

Iced Tea and Damian’s Elixir!
 
Farm Members: Adults, $21.95
Non-Farm Members: Adults, $24.95
Children 4 to 9 yrs old: $12.95
Children 3 yrs old or less: Free
All prices are subject to a 7% Mass meal

“Peter and John” film Screening @ Falmouth Academy

May 23, 2015 by Beth Colt

The film is set in 1872 Nantucket, when reverberations from the civil war were still in the air.  It tells the story of two brothers whose relationship strains when the younger one receives word of an unexpected and strange inheritance-and both boys become interested in a mysterious young woman who arrives on their island.

$25 for 6pm reception with film maker, Jay Craven

$15 for screening only

tickets on sail at Eight Cousins Bookstore or online at www.woodsholefilmfestival.com

Dinner & a Movie: By and By: New Orleans Gospel at a Crossroads

May 9, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

By and By: New Orleans Gospel at a Crossroads

‘By and By’ tells the story of a fading tradition, a torn community, and a family bound to keep them both alive. At the center of the film is a powerful New Orleans gospel quartet, the Electrifying Crown Seekers; a group USA Today calls ‘the essence of Jazz Fest … more explosive than any rock headliner.’

Set against a backdrop of post-Katrina New Orleans, ‘By and By’ is a classic family story of change vs. tradition, young vs. old, focused on a son’s unavoidable conflict: to continue the 46 year musical legacy of his father, or to strike out on his own. Powered by raw gospel music and a cast of unforgettable characters, the story of ‘By and By’ is truly timeless.

Dinner & a Movie: Brave New Wild

April 25, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

Brave New Wild

Stumbling upon her father’s hi8 tapes, a daughter discovers a world of delinquent oddballs and wino nomad-poets who dedicated their life to an absurdist art form: rock climbing. Through a kaleidoscopic mishmash of campfire stories with the most eccentric climbing pioneers, colorful archival footage, hand-animated cartoons, and the director’s family home videos, Brave New Wild explores an answer to the question of why climb when there’s nothing to gain — and everything to lose.

Dinner & a Movie: Life Inside Out

April 11, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

Life Inside Out

Life Inside Out tells the story of Laura, the mother of three teenage boys, and her youngest son Shane, the family misfit and a disappointment to his father. When we first meet Laura, she is half-heartedly hosting a scrap booking party for her sister Lydia’s new multi-level marketing business. When she stumbles upon her long forgotten guitar, a gift from her mother and the former passion of her youthful life, she is taken under its spell and soon rediscovers her love for songwriting. Shane, sullen, ear buds perpetually in his ears, has cut himself off from the activities that his father and brothers enjoy. When Laura impulsively decides to sing at her first open-mic night, she takes Shane along for the ride; an act of both pity and motherly instinct. Her first performance is a borderline disaster but with Shane’s encouragement, she eventually tries again. Despite her rocky entry into the late night mélange of musicians and unusual characters that populate the open mic nights, Laura starts to blossom and Shane seems oddly at home. Soon, following his mother’s lead and with the help of YouTube and a couple of new-found mentors at the club, Shane picks up Laura’s guitar and begins to discover musical gifts of his own. As family pressures rise Laura finds herself pulled between the worlds of responsibility and creative joy. Ultimately, her first brave steps prove to be the catalyst for changing not only her life, but also Shane’s, in complex and unpredictable ways.

Dinner & a Movie: Wicker Kittens

March 28, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

Wicker Kittens

Open the box. Dump out all the pieces. And scramble for your lives. Because this is competitive jigsaw puzzling. And it turns even the mildest of mannered Midwesterners into stone-cold competitors. Every January, the top teams in the game gather at the St. Paul Winter Carnival in frigid Minnesota to determine the fastest puzzlers in the country. Wicker Kittens invites you to choose your favorite contestants„the returning champs, the upstart challengers, the sunny family or the dark horse team with nothing to lose„and watch them try to put the pieces back together.

Dinner & a Movie: The God Question

March 14, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

The God Question

A startling breakthrough at MIT produces the first super-intelligent computer capable of thinking independently. However, when it shuts down hundreds of websites it finds offensive, federal regulators quickly padlock the MIT lab in order to study it. Stephen Kendrick, who runs a supercomputer at University of Massachusetts in Amherst, taught at MIT previously and was one of the key code writers for the project. Hearing this, a Yale philosopher, Jane Hurst, suggests this: Feed the computer every book, news article, research paper – essentially all human knowledge – then ask it the ultimate question. Is there evidence for God, for a spiritual framework to life? Kendrick tells her the question was one of the first the MIT team planned to ask – until the federal ban was imposed. However, Kendrick has a copy of the MIT software and a computer capable of running it. He decides to secretly defy the federal ban and ask the question, aided by a colleague, Alan Moss. They make plans to try on the weekends, when they can work undetected. There is an obstacle, though: The computer itself. Each time they load the MIT software and ask the question, the computer eventually shuts itself down, destroying its memory and leaving no trace of what it was thinking, no matter what they do to get around it. When the FBI begins to question Kendrick, Moss loses his courage and drops out. However, Jane Hurst joins Kendrick for one final attempt to get the answer.

Dinner & a Movie: The Longest Game

February 28, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

The Longest Game

Meet Hal, 87; Charlie, 87 and Maurie, 87. Three of a group of friends who gather every day at one p.m. in the village of Dorset, Vermont to play a game called ‘paddle tennis’. They have been playing together for years. Poignant and funny, THE LONGEST GAME takes on the ‘game’ of life, the stories we tell and the underlying forces that connect us all.

Dinner & A Movie: Druid Peak

February 14, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

Druid Peak

“On the ragged edge of the world I’ll roam, and the home of the wolf shall be my home.” –Robert Service, The Nostomaniac. Druid Peak is a coming of age story about a troubled teenage boy who finds a home tracking wolves in the wild lands of the Wyoming. Sixteen year-old Owen is a bully with a mean streak. Growing up in coal country West Virginia, he struggles against the claustrophobia of small town life, lashing out against school and family. But when his actions lead to the death of a friend, he is sent to live with his estranged father, Everett, a biologist on Yellowstone’s wolf reintroduction program. At first, Owen wants no part of this new life. Then he comes face to face with a wolf. The creature’s deep, penetrating gaze startles him, stirring something long dead inside his own self. Sensing signs of change, Everett encourages Owen to collect some basic data about the wolf he saw and its family pack. Owen’s small assignment grows into a passion and his own life becomes tied to the Druid Peak pack and their struggle for survival. Shot on location in West Virginia, Wyoming, Montana and Utah, the film stars Andrew Wilson (Rushmore, The Royal Tennenbaums), Spencer Treat Clark (Mystic River, Gladiator) and Rachel Korine (Spring Breakers, Septien). A coming of age story with a conservation twist, Druid Peak is a film about the human soul’s need for wild things, and the challenges of holding onto them.

Dinner & A Movie: Little White Lie

January 17, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

Little White Lie

Little White Lie tells Lacey Schwartz’s story of growing up in a typical upper-middle-class Jewish household in Woodstock, NY, with loving parents and a strong sense of her Jewish identity „ despite the questions from those around her about how a white girl could have such dark skin. She believes her family’s explanation that her looks were inherited from her dark-skinned Sicilian grandfather. But when her parents abruptly split, her gut starts to tell her something different. At eighteen, she finally confronts her mother and learns the truth: her biological father was not the man who raised her, but a black man named Rodney with whom her mother had an affair. Afraid of losing her relationship with her parents, Lacey doesn’t openly acknowledge her newly discovered black identity with her white family until her biological father dies shortly before Lacey’s thirtieth birthday. Following the funeral, Lacey begins a quest to reconcile the hidden pieces of her life and heal her relationship with her father. What defines our identity, our family of origin or the family that raises us? How do we come to terms with the sins and mistakes of our parents? Lacey discovers that answering those questions means understanding her parents’ stories as well as her own. She pieces together her family history and the story of her dual identity using home videos, archival footage, interviews, and episodes from her own life. Little White Lie is a personal documentary about the legacy of family secrets, denial, and redemption.

Dinner & A Movie: The Winding Stream

January 3, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Woods Hole Film Festival Winter Film Series & Quicks Hole Tavern are proud to collaborate to present DINNER & A MOVIE, the winter film series of the Woods Hole Film Festival.  Dinner and a Movie offers elegant dining with superb independent films at the Quicks Hole Tavern located at 29 Railroad Ave, Woods Hole.  For $27 per person, select from a preset menu of sumptuous food prepared specially for the evening.  This price includes entree and movie, but does not include beverage, dessert, tax or tip.  Quicks Hole Tavern will offer two dinner seatings at either 5:15pm or 6:30pm and the screening follows at 7:30pm at Redfield Auditorium, WHOI, 57 Water Street, Woods Hole, a short walk down the street.  Reservations are required for both dinner and the screening.  The Woods hole Film Festival will offer a screening only option for $15 per person.  Reserve by email info@woodsholefilmfestival.org or call 508-495-3456.  For online reservations and to read descriptions of the upcoming films please visit www.woodsholefilmfestival.org — evenings do sell out!

Tonight’s feature:

The Winding Stream

The Winding Stream tells the story of the American roots music dynasty, the Carters and the Cashes.  Starting with the Original Carter Family, the film traces the ebb and flow of their influence, the transformation of that act into the Carter Sisters, June Carter’s marital alliance with legend Johnny Cash, and the efforts of present-day family to keep this long musical legacy alive. The Carters didn’t just play the music of the hill country. They helped invent it.  A.P. was both composer and song collector, arranging snippets of ancient, musty melodies into commercial American popular music.  Maybelle took the then-underutilized guitar and made it into the cornerstone of country instrumentation, in no small part by developing innovative ways of playing it that are now commonplace. And Sara became the first well-known woman’s voice in country music, stamping it with the eerie Gothic quality we find in so much of that genre’s canon now. The stream these three created has turned into a rushing river and has moved through several generations of musicians. Arguably, there would be no Folk Revival of the ‘60s without them, no country-rock bands of the 70s, and no alt-country hipsters of our present era. Will the Circle Be Unbroken?  Keep on the Sunny Side. Worried Man Blues.  Are You Lonesome Tonight?  These are just some of the hundreds of songs the Original Carter Family presented to the world. It’s hard to overstate their influence on American music.

Dinner and a Movie

November 29, 2014 by Beth Colt

Join us for a Woods Hole Film Festival Documentary called “Jon Imber’s Left Hand” shown in our private theater and dinner presented by our excellent culinary team.  Film showings at 3:30pm and 7pm. Dinner served between 5:30 – 6:30pm.  Call 508-495-5500 for film details and reservations. Limited seating.

Professional Development Writers Workshop

December 29, 2013 by Beth Colt

Woods Hole —  long cherished as an epicenter of marine science — is growing in it’s reputation as a place for artists to gather as well.  This year, for the fourth time, the Woods Hole Inn and Woods Hole Film Festival unite with a weekend of professional development writers with exploration in screenwriting and a special focus on television, being held February 21-23 in Woods Hole.

Drama writer P.K. Simonds (Reign, Ghost Whisperer, Party of Five) joins comedy writer Ian Maxtone-Graham (Simpsons, Saturday Night Live) for two days of exploration in screenwriting.  Filled with helpful ideas about how to break in and what to do when the door opens a crack, veterans Simonds and Maxtone-Graham will regale the crowd with stories from the trenches.  How does an episode of TV get plotted, what is the “writers room,”  what kind of spec script should you write to get there?  Professional development for writers rarely takes place in such a beautiful spot, with great leaders and an intimate setting like this one.

The weekend kicks off with a wine and cheese reception Friday night at the Woods Hole Inn.  After breakfast at the inn the next morning, the TV writers gather for professional development writers workshops — with two sessions that day led by Simonds and Maxtone-Graham.  Most of the aspiring TV writers choose to attend “Dinner and a Movie” together on Saturday night at the Captain Kidd (additional fees for this element).  On Sunday, the writers gather once more for a morning session to wrap it all up.

The TV Writers Retreat Fee is $299 per person and applications are being accepted at the Woods Hole Film Festival website (biographical info and a writing sample is required).  The Woods Hole Inn is offering a deeply discounted two night package on this professional development writers retreat where $369 queen and $399 standard king includes the Retreat Fee AND two nights at the Inn.

Comments from previous TV Writer Guests: “I loved that after years of looking into the TV screen, I was brought into the inside and got a chance to see what it is to look out at the audience.”

“I am walking away with a new view on television writing, new contacts, new energy.  I am so thankful for that.”

Woods Hole Writers Retreat Woods Hole Inn package save money

 

Woods Hole Inn offers unique events

Playing in Traffic

May 8, 2011 by Beth Colt

Sam Waterston entertains the actors attending "The Actors Symposium" last week in Woods Hole.

What is it about actors that captures your imagination and makes you want to know more about them?  You look at Sam Waterston’s familiar face and you think — is he like that guy he played on “Law and Order”?  Is he funny?  Is he smart?  Does he really know how to write a great closing argument?

Well, if you had been in Woods Hole last weekend, you would have discovered the answer to these questions and much more.  In collaboration with the Woods Hole Film Festival and the Woods Hole Inn, actors gathered here for a weekend of learning about the craft and the trade of acting professionally.    Caroline Pickman, of CP Casting gave a two hour presentation on the expectations of the audition process, including getting the actors up on their feet to try out some of her audition material (known as “sides” in the business) from a Showtime television series.  And Beth Colt presented a session on working with agents and managers, what to expect and how to engage the professionals who are the gatekeepers to a good career in acting.

But by far the highlight was our time with Sam Waterston.   In the interest of full disclosure, let me explain that Sam and I worked together about a decade ago.  Our company was called Stardance Productions and we developed many projects and made one wonderful movie together (called “A House Divided” starring Sam, Jennifer Beals, Tim Daly and Lisa Gay Hamilton for Showtime).  So I know Sam well, and am reasonably well-equipped to ask him interesting questions.

We started with how his career got started (Yale undergrad, summer stock and then cast in the play “Oh Dad, Poor Dad…”).  I asked him if he ever had a day job and he told a delightful story about working at Macy’s back when they sold bundles of theatre tickets.  Like all of Sam’s stories, this was a self-depricating tale that ends with his firing for insubordination to a customer.  It was hilarious.  He told us about booking “The Killing Fields” (for which he was later nominated for an Academy Award) and his transition to television in the NBC series “I’ll Fly Away.”  He shared tidbits about Roland Joffe, and many of the other notables he has worked with (Woody Allen, Jeff Bridges and more).

Sam’s general advice for the young actors in the room was not to pursue acting unless you have to,  as he put it, “Only if there is nothing else you can do.”  The demands of the profession are so bruising he told them, it leaves it’s mark on you.  But he also advised, “You have to play in traffic if you want to get hit.”

Woods Hole is more than established as an international epicenter for the life sciences and oceanography, so it is a pleasure to see the reputation of this little village extend itself into the national arts scene.

We are playing in traffic here, and we intend to keep playing until we get hit:)

Sam Waterston and Beth Colt at the Actors Symposium in Woods Hole May 1, 2011.

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