Phone:508-495-0248
Phone:508-495-0248

Archives

Lecture, “Encounters With New England’s Most Imperiled Wildlife”

April 2, 2015 by Beth Colt

Rhode Island-based science writer Todd McLeish has been writing about wildlife and environmental issues for more than 25 years.  In more than 100 magazine articles, he has highlighted numerous threatened species, profiled biologists and wildlife artists and described encounters with a wide variety of animals.  In this talk, he will introduce the remarkable lives of the rarest and most endangered wildlife in New England, from birds and beetles to whales and plants.  Join him on an entertaining first-person journey as he tracks basking sharks, collects biopsy samples from humpback whales, investigates the nesting burrows of elusive seabirds and observes the metamorphosis of rare dragonflies.  His talk is based on two books he has authored about imperiled species.  These will be available for purchase and signing following his presentation.

 

Lecture: “Encounters with New England’s Most Imperiled Wildlife”

February 20, 2015 by Beth Colt

2015 Winter and Spring Speaker Series

presented by

The 300 Committee Land Trust

& Salt Pond Areas Bird Sanctuaries, Inc.

Rhode Island-based science writer Todd McLeish has been writing about wildlife and environmental issues for more than 25 years. In more than 100 magazine articles, he has highlighted numerous threatened species, profiled biologists and wildlife artists and described encounters with a wide variety of animals. In this talk, he will introduce the remarkable lives of the rarest and most endangered wildlife in New England, from birds and beetles to whales and plants. Join him on an entertaining first-person journey as he tracks basking sharks, collects biopsy samples from humpback whales, investigates the nesting burrows of elusive seabirds and observes the metamorphosis of rare dragonflies. His talk is based on two books he has authored about imperiled species. These will be available for purchase and signing following his presentation.

Birds of Prey: The Lives of Aerial Hunters

November 15, 2014 by Beth Colt

Birds of Prey: The Lives of Aerial Hunters

The 300 Committee Land Trust invites families to learn about owls, hawks, falcons and vultures.

Marla Isaacs of New England Reptile and Raptor Exhibits will present a program using live birds of prey about the lives of aerial hunters.

Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

A Walk in Beebe Woods

February 12, 2012 by Beth Colt

Walking the Cape Cod woods in winter is a special treat, especially after a light dusting of snow. The jewel in Falmouth’s crown of conservation land is a 300+ acre property called Beebe Woods, which astounds the visitor with ponds, paths, ridges, hidden stone walls and wildlife.  I wandered there for several hours yesterday, seeing few other people and enjoying the way the new snow makes the woods come alive with color.

Despite the low cloud cover, everything was aglow — the rusty colored pine needles lining the paths, dark roots growing over lichen covered rocks, sand pocked with footprints from deer and coyotes, slippery patches of swamp-mud and the flat black surface of the icy ponds.  We spent two hours exploring and never crossed our own path — from Ter Heune Drive (near the hospital) clear across to Peterson Farm with its wide open meadows, from a high ridge path fit for mountain goats to the edge of Ice House pond near Sippewissett Road and the perimeter of the Punch Bowl, another incredible kettle hole pond.

This refuge, a sanctuary in the Walden Pond vernacular, is an incredible asset to the town of Falmouth and it’s many visitors.  Here, you can visit the high church of nature and commune on your own with a spirituality that soars through the high tree cover like a red-tailed hawk hunting voles (which you may well see on your journey).  Moving though this landscape in silence — listening to the crunch of boots on thin snow, scanning the hilltops for deer or fox — erases your everyday woes, De-fragging the hard-drive of your barnacle-crusted brain.

Tracing the old stone walls, green with lichen and frosted with snow, made me think of the early settlers who spent decades hand-digging rocks from the sandy soil and marking the boundaries of their primitive homesteads.  How must they have felt, looking at these hard-earned walls?

Here are a few things I saw along the way:

Peterson Farm, birdhouse, winter

Bird houses covered with lichen…

Lichen covered stone wall in snow, New England.

Old stone walls nestled between decades of un-raked leaves and fallen limbs…

walking on Cape Cod in winter

Sandy soil paths, roots exposed when worn by thousands of walking visitors like me…

Falmouth Mass, walking in winter, snow

The icy black water of the Punch Bowl… no swimming today.

For a map and more information about this astounding resource, read more about the 300 Committee here.  Without the vision and generosity of a few local leaders, this land would have been developed into cul-de-sacs with matching mailboxes and over 500 cookie-cutter homes.   Forever insuring that this land is available for wildlife and the appreciation of nature, the 300 Committee is to be commended for all their efforts — my appreciative donation is in the mail.  And I encourage all visitors to the Woods Hole Inn to explore this unique spot in any season.   Ask us for the map at the front desk.

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