Phone:508-495-0248
Phone:508-495-0248

Archives

Under the Waves- WHOI Science in Local Waters

June 7, 2015 by Beth Colt

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers work in ocean basins all over the world. But what’s happening in our local waters? Come and meet scientists, engineers, and other WHOI staff  and see some of the equipment used to uncover the mysteries within our own regional waters.

  • SharkCam
  • Make your own jellyfish
  • Imaging Flow Cytobot
  • Whale buoy
  • Squid, river herring, oysters, offshore canyons
  • and more

 

Exhibits will be on the lawn behind the Redfield Building, 45 Water Street, and at the WHOI Ocean Science Exhibit Center, 15 School Street.

Science Journalist Angela Posada-Swafford on “The View from Antarctica”

June 6, 2015 by Beth Colt

Talk by Angela Posada-Swafford, science journalist and recipient of the 2014 Byron H. Waksman Award for Excellence in the Public Communication of Life Sciences
“The View from Antarctica: Reporting on Climate Change from the White South”
This talk is part of the MBL Ecosystems Center 40th Anniversary Celebration – Free and open to the public
Lillie Auditorium, 7 MBL Street, Woods Hole

Author Discussion, “The Long Haul: The Future of New England Fisheries”

April 29, 2015 by Beth Colt

The Long Haul: A Special Event with Steve Junker & Brian Morris from WCAI Woods Hole

Join us on Wednesday, April 29 from 6:00-8:00PM for a special event with the Falmouth Public Library & WCAI, Cape & Islands Public Radio in Woods Hole , as we invite two co-authors of the highly anticipated book, “The Long Haul: The Future of New England Fisheries” to Falmouth. Steve Junker and Brian Morris, both members of the small team of Woods Hole journalists, will dive into stories and reports highlighted in their book, beginning in the storied fishing towns of Cape Cod and throughout Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard, captivating their audience with research and insight gained regarding the state of our fisheries here today.

Copies of “The Long Haul: The Future of New England Fisheries” will be available for purchase and authors will be available to meet with audience members and provide signatures.

Registration is required. For more information and to register, please contact the Falmouth Public Library at (508) 457-2555, info@falmouthpubliclibrary.org, text “askfpl” to 66746, or visit the Reference Desk. Visit our Events Calendar on our website to discover more exciting programs. All programs are free of charge.

Lecture, “Encounters With New England’s Most Imperiled Wildlife”

April 2, 2015 by Beth Colt

Rhode Island-based science writer Todd McLeish has been writing about wildlife and environmental issues for more than 25 years.  In more than 100 magazine articles, he has highlighted numerous threatened species, profiled biologists and wildlife artists and described encounters with a wide variety of animals.  In this talk, he will introduce the remarkable lives of the rarest and most endangered wildlife in New England, from birds and beetles to whales and plants.  Join him on an entertaining first-person journey as he tracks basking sharks, collects biopsy samples from humpback whales, investigates the nesting burrows of elusive seabirds and observes the metamorphosis of rare dragonflies.  His talk is based on two books he has authored about imperiled species.  These will be available for purchase and signing following his presentation.

 

Seal and Seabird Watch

March 14, 2015 by Beth Colt

Join the Coalition for a heated boat tour to look for harbor seals and winter seabirds on Woods Hole. Begin at the Buzzards Bay Discovery Center, where guests will learn about harbor seals and their life in Buzzards Bay and beyond. Then board the M/V Richard Edwards to search for these playful mammals on the water. Binoculars provided.  Members $20, Non Members $30, Children under 12 $15.  Registration is required for all Bay Adventures.  To RSVP please contact the Buzzards Bay Coalition at 508-999-6363 ext. 219.

MBL Falmouth Forum: “The Economic Costs of Climate Change”

March 13, 2015 by Beth Colt

Scholars have wondered for centuries about the link between climate and economic development. In the context of climate change, understanding these linkages has become all the more urgent. This talk will review a rapidly expanding body of new research that sheds light on how, when, and where temperature and other climatic variables influence economic outcomes. This talk will also consider the implications of recent research findings for public policy.

Benjamin Jones is a Professor of Strategy at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. Jones’s research considers obstacles to growth in developing countries, with recent work considering subjects such as national leadership, higher education, and climate change. He further studies the forces that drive technological progress in advanced economies, with recent work examining the relationship between age and creativity and the role of collaboration in innovation. His publications have appeared in leading academic journals such as the Review of Economic Studies, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and Science, and have been profiled in media outlets such as CNN, the Economist, and the Freakonomics blog of the New York Times.

Sponsored by the MBL Associates, and generously supported this season by Sandy and David Bakalar, the event is free and open to the public.

An optional buffet dinner will precede Jones’ lecture at 6:00 PM at the MBL’s Swope Center, 5 North Street, Woods Hole. Tickets are $30 (meal includes salad, pasta or potatoes, two entrees, wine, dessert, tax and gratuity) and must be purchased in advance at Eight Cousins Bookstore, Main Street, Falmouth, or at the MBL Communications Office, 127 Water Street, Woods Hole. Dinner tickets are available until they sell out or until 5:00 pm on Tuesday, March 10. For more information, contact the MBL Communications Office at (508) 289-7423 or comm@mbl.edu.

MBL Falmouth Forum: “Out of the Blue: Nantucket and the Pacific World”

February 27, 2015 by Beth Colt

Whales’ Teeth, Sea Cucumbers and Castaways Topic of MBL Falmouth Forum

Sponsored by the MBL Associates, and generously supported this season by Sandy and David Bakalar, the event is free and open to the public.

The histories of Whippy, Cary and the commodities they traded offer testimonials about cultural and environmental changes during the nineteenth century. Their stories also reveal the deep interconnections between maritime communities in the North Atlantic and the South Pacific.

The son of Jerry and Lalise Melillo of Falmouth, Edward “Ted” Melillo, a graduate of Falmouth Academy, earned his bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in history from Yale University. After a one-year position as the Kiriyama Distinguished Research Fellow at the University of San Francisco’s Center for the Pacific Rim, he taught for a year in the history department at Oberlin College and spent a year as a visiting assistant professor in the Earth and Environment Department at Franklin & Marshall College. Since 2009, Melillo has been a faculty member at Amherst College where he teaches courses on global environmental history, the history of the Pacific World, and commodities in world historical perspective.

Melillo is the author of the forthcoming book, Strangers on Familiar Soil: Rediscovering the Chile-California Connection, 1786-2008, which will be published in the fall of 2015. He is also the co-editor of Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views on Environmental History, published in December 2014.  His articles have appeared in numerous journals, and he has given nearly fifty lectures and presentations on topics ranging from the social history of the global nitrogen cycle to the role of insect-derived commodities in shaping world history.

An optional buffet dinner will precede Melillo’s lecture at 6:00 PM at the MBL’s Swope Center, 5 North Street, Woods Hole. Tickets are $30 (meal includes salad, pasta or potatoes, two entrees, wine, dessert, tax and gratuity) and must be purchased in advance at Eight Cousins Bookstore, Main Street, Falmouth, or at the MBL Communications Office, 127 Water Street, Woods Hole. Dinner tickets are available until they sell out or until 5:00 pm on Tuesday February 24. For more information, contact the MBL Communications Office at (508) 289-7423 or comm@mbl.edu.

Lecture: “Encounters with New England’s Most Imperiled Wildlife”

February 20, 2015 by Beth Colt

2015 Winter and Spring Speaker Series

presented by

The 300 Committee Land Trust

& Salt Pond Areas Bird Sanctuaries, Inc.

Rhode Island-based science writer Todd McLeish has been writing about wildlife and environmental issues for more than 25 years. In more than 100 magazine articles, he has highlighted numerous threatened species, profiled biologists and wildlife artists and described encounters with a wide variety of animals. In this talk, he will introduce the remarkable lives of the rarest and most endangered wildlife in New England, from birds and beetles to whales and plants. Join him on an entertaining first-person journey as he tracks basking sharks, collects biopsy samples from humpback whales, investigates the nesting burrows of elusive seabirds and observes the metamorphosis of rare dragonflies. His talk is based on two books he has authored about imperiled species. These will be available for purchase and signing following his presentation.

Science Before Supper Series 2014/15

February 19, 2015 by Beth Colt

The MBL Associates and the Falmouth Public Library  present “Science Before Supper,” a series of talks by MBL scientists designed to whet the public’s appetite for all things science.
The free talks are designed especially for non-scientists.
Light refreshments will be served.

February 19

  Interrogating a Microbial Planet
Mitch Sogin, Senior Scientist, MBL’s Bay Paul Center

 

Science Before Supper Series 2014/15

January 8, 2015 by Beth Colt

The MBL Associates and the Falmouth Public Library  present “Science Before Supper,” a series of talks by MBL scientists designed to whet the public’s appetite for all things science.
The free talks are designed especially for non-scientists.
Light refreshments will be served.

January 8

  Exploding Volcanoes and Microbial Life in the Deep Sea
Julie Huber, Associate Director, MBL’s Bay Paul Center

Exploring the SEA

June 18, 2012 by Beth Colt

Corwith Cramer open for tours in Woods Hole.

Yesterday, the Sea Education Association (SEA) opened the hatches to their primary Atlantic sailing vessel, the sturdy clipper ship Corwith Cramer, for an afternoon of guided visits.  Students and teachers were on board explaining the ship, their scientific mission, and the logistics of day-to-day life on a floating school.

SEA runs semester and summer learning excursions for high school and college age kids.  The group we met yesterday had spent five weeks in Woods Hole training and preparing, then the last six weeks sailing up the East Coast from St. Croix aboard this very ship.

Home port for the "Corwith Cramer" is Woods Hole.

The ship is a floating laboratory, replete with a science library, and lots of gear for water collection, monitoring and analysis.  Students had vacated the hold that morning, and will spend the next two weeks preparing research papers on the data collected in the cruise.

Since getting out on the water is one of the great perks of the marine scientist, you can imagine that there is a long list to berth/study on the Corwith Cramer, and I got the sense that the students were very serious in their pursuit of science.

Corwith Cramer below deck in Woods Hole.

Being in the hospitality business, I was curious about the sleeping arrangements…Let’s just say this is not a pillow top mattress!  But students said the narrow berths were very comfortable, especially when exhausted by a long day at sea.

Corwith Cramer, an SEA vessel, docked in Woods Hole.

Every young Jacques Cousteau dreams of life on the water, and these students get to live it, literally learning the ropes needed to hoist the full sails of the ship.  Students told us that while there is a motor, most of the journey is under sail, including maneuvers to collect water samples that involve jibing and going in irons.  Tricky stuff even for experienced sailors!

"Steer a course for others to follow"

It was a great afternoon on an incredible clear summer’s day, but I especially loved the school motto, emblazoned in brass on the helm:  “Steer a course for others to follow.”  Words to live by.

Landfall Restaurant and the rest of Woods Hole seen from the deck of the Corwith Cramer, Cape Cod summer.

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